Curriculum and prophetic teaching

Introduction to curriculum

The curriculum is founded on a Biblical worldview and regularly assessed to ensure that God remains at the centre.  Click here for more on this.  Although, as an independent school, we're not obliged to follow the National Curriculum, we keep abreast of it and use material where it coincides with our aims and values.

Pupils' progress is monitored carefully by teachers, using levelled assessments in Years 7-11 where appropriate.  We also use NFER test materials with certain age groups.  In the final three years, pupils study for a range of GCSE examinations.  The school's approach to the curriculum varies according to the age of the children.  For further information, please download a school prospectus.

Prophetic teaching

Teaching is far more than communicating facts and information.  We believe God is looking for Spirit-filled Christian teachers who are committed to teaching from a Biblical point of view.  Teachers who facilitate the release of the prophetic (revelation) in everything they do.  Here at Immanuel School, we've come to realise that this is a critical success factor, if we’re truly to fulfill the ministry God’s called us into.

God’s view of the world

Teaching prophetically requires us to receive revelation from the Holy Spirit, to have a fully-orbed biblical world view and an ability to pass this on to the pupils.  It means learning to see beyond the natural and physical world and having our eyes open to see into, and understand, the unseen realm.  It involves endeavouring to see the world as Elisha saw it, when he prayed for his servant to have his eyes opened to see the angelic army surrounding them (2 Kings 6:17).  Our views have to be shaped by, and centred in, God’s view of the world and what’s going on in it, so there is a bigger picture to bear in mind at all times.

God's meta-narrative

If our view of history is rooted in the knowledge that God changes times and seasons; he sets up kings and deposes them (Daniel 2:21), and that history will culminate in the return of Jesus, we’ll teach historical events as part of that meta-narrative, not as isolated events in themselves, or events merely influenced by physical forces.  We’ll be showing through our teaching that God’s purposes are progressed through the history of the nations.

The importance of revelation

Teaching prophetically means that we have to learn to teach from our spirits and by revelation.  We have to leave room in our planning for revelation and expect God to speak to us as we teach.  This is the ‘rhema’ or ‘now’ word of God.  Unless we’re developing our experience of God in this way we can’t teach the pupils to do likewise.

  

If our view of history is rooted in the knowledge that God changes times and seasons; he sets up kings and deposes them (Daniel 2:21), and that history is linear, culminating in the return of Jesus, we’ll teach historical events as part of that meta-narrative, not as isolated events in themselves, or events merely influenced by physical forces

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